help_outline Skip to main content
MENU
Shopping Cart
cancel

News / Articles

Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Update-Oct 2020

AIS Committee  | Published on 10/31/2020

AIS planned activity for Spring of 2021 


Click AIS Information for new Updated AIS Information Page  

Current conditions of Round Lakes invasive species 

Our goal continues to be focused on controlling existing aquatic invasive species to minimize navigation impairment.  Purple loosestrife was observed in 2014 in Little Round Lake, but not documented during the 2020 surveys in either lake.  Flowering rush was found at one location in southern Musky Bay of Round Lake in 2019 & 2020 but is mixed with native emergent vegetation and not cause for concern.  

 

Eurasian watermilfoil continues to be the main concern in Round Lake.  The RLPOA realizes that, unfortunately, complete eradication of EWM is not a realistic goal.  Chemical treatment has had success since EWM was discovered in Round Lake in 1993 and first treated in 1994 and has proven to be the most effective treatment in controlling the spread of EWM as well as the most economical option (the most expensive chemical treatment year for Round Lakes was $32,600 in 2019, a significant portion used to successfully treat Richardson Bay. The largest non-chemical treatment was DASH in 2018 at a cost of 41,200). 

 

Based on 2020 EWM survey results, the following beds will be targeted for herbicide treatment in 2021. A20, B20, C20, D20, & S19 located in or near Blue Island Bay (Map 8).  G20 located in Fisherman's Bay (Map 3).  U20 & T20 along the southwest shore of the large peninsula (Map 2).  X20 in Richardson's Bay (Map 4).  

 

Based on 2020 EWM survey results, the following beds will be targeted for herbicide treatment in 2021. A20, B20, C20, D20, & S19 located in or near Blue Island Bay (Map 8).  G20 located in Fisherman's Bay (Map 3).  U20 & T20 along the southwest shore of the large peninsula (Map 2).  X20 in Richardson's Bay (Map 4).  

 

It is our hope, that with ongoing rigorous surveying to guide herbicide treatment, the occurrence of EWM will remain low in Round Lake with greater manageability and more cost-effectiveness in keeping the EWM at low levels.

 

Seeking One Year DNR Grant to Fund Education, Surveys and EWM Treatment

We have applied for a one-year grant from the DNR to assist with funding for next year’s AIS activities. This project will allow continued surveying of EWM in Round and Little Round Lakes.  Such work is necessary to better understand effective EWM control techniques in these lakes.  For example, DASH was used to control EWM in 2017 and 2018.  The RLPOA was eager to have this method of EWM control available at that time.  Lake residents, especially in Hinton Bay, became concerned that DASH caused increased occurrence of EWM in 2017-2019.  Lake residents observed fragmentation of EWM caused by DASH even though volunteers were netting fragmented EWM from their kayaks.  There remains strong opposition to DASH in Hinton Bay because residents observed significant EWM increase after DASH was employed, ultimately leading property owners and the RLPOA to conclude that DASH made EWM "worse". As a result, DASH was not used in 2019 or 2020 and herbicide was used in its place. 

 

RLPOA also understands that with rapid herbicide dissipation in small-scale treatments, there is concern over effectiveness of this method. However, RLPOA believes this to be the most effective means of keeping EWM managed and at non-impairment levels. That is way our grant proposal includes another year of surveying to delineate new EWM beds and take rake samples at 500 points at old and new beds managed in some way since 2018.  Furthermore, the RLPOA is interested in the use of ProcellaCOR (PCOR) and would like to closely track efficacy and impacts to native species.  A PCOR treatment trial at 1.25 ac 8' deep in 2020 at the northeast corner in Hinton Bay. This project is unique and necessary because it allows for continued rigorous surveys of areas that have been treated since 2018 as well as ongoing control. We continue to subscribe to the practice of 

integrated pest management (IPM) principles which employs information about EWM's life cycle and its negative effects in combination with available control methods to determine the most economical means with minimal hazard to people, property, and environment. 

Round & Little Round APMP FINAL 102820